Teladoc - Teladoc... but not too much or they'll cut you off

Posted on Tuesday, December 28th, 2010 at 4:55pm CST by b6231897

Product: Telephone On-Call Doctor/Medical Consultations

Company: Teladoc

Location: 4100 Spring Valley, Suite 600
Dallas, TX, 75244, US

URL: http://www.teladoc.com/

Category: Other

With Teladoc membership, you are promised timely access to real medical doctors "anytime, anywhere". In fact their site also states "Teladoc is there for you 24/7 wherever you may be."

But there's a caveat. If you use Teladoc "too often", you are quickly scolded by mail. They sent you a form letter telling you to use the Teladoc service less and see your in-person doctors more often. The problem is, what if you ARE seeing your in-person doctors regularly but you have a doctor who has limited hours and doesn't have an answering service? What if you're on business in another city? Isn't this the purpose of Teladoc? Apparently not.

I used Teladoc, on average, once every 2 months. Teladoc sent me a letter every 4 months telling me to see my doctor more in-person. Each time they wrote me a letter I called them or emailed them or wrote them back a physical letter explaining that I *DO* see my regular doctors often and that I *DO* update my Teladoc online medical health record with the applicable information EACH time I see my primary care doctor or have a change in health. I was doing everything right.

.....Yet Teladoc terminated my account without any opportunity to appeal or be further explained as to the reason why. What constitutes "too much" use of the service, and how dynamic is that rule being applied? I don't think using Teladoc every 2 months is overkill, especially when that is averaging over a period of a year.. so for a few months I might not use it at all, but in other months I might use it a bit more often because I'm traveling or my doctor's on vacation and being self-employed without insurance I don't want to do $1500 ER visits for a sinus infection.

I believe Teladoc is using false advertising to lure in customers with a whiz-bang web site and deceptive promises, and then dump them once they actually use the service upon seeing benefit in it. And that's not right.


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